Since the mid 1990s Greco models have used other serial number formats as well.

Most of the Greco open book headstock Gibson replicas were made by Fuji Gen Gakki.

There are some Ob G LPS models which were produced in very limited numbers, like the 54 LP (stoptail and P90's), and some Limited Edition runs of (usually) 50 guitars .

The Japanese models usually had a long tenon like the 1959 LP's, and are not weight relieved, the US Standard version did not have a long tenon and is weight relieved.

The Orville by Gibson Les Paul Reissue series (LPR ) 1993-1994, were the top of the range Japanese produced Gibsons, they all have stock Gibson USA electrics and pickups, usually nitrocellulose laquer finishes, blank truss rod covers and fret edge binding, and were only made from late 1992 to early 1995, they also tend to have the fattest necks of all the Ob G's.

The word is abused a lot though because it drives the price of a guitar up.

What exactly is a lawsuit guitar and why are they so popular?

If you are interested in buying a lawsuit guitar, make sure you read through this article first and then do a lot more research before you start bidding on a guitar.

Anyone who's looking for vintage guitars on Ebay comes across the word "lawsuit".Greco Gibson replicas started using serial numbers around 1975 and pre 1975 models had a Greco logo that looked like "Gneco".From the mid 1970s to the mid 1990s Greco models have mostly used 2 serial number formats for non Acoustic models. Sometimes a month letter is used in an MYPPPP format.Definition: lawsuit guitars are high quality copies of popular American brand name guitars (like Fender and Gibson) produced by Japanese companies in the 1970s.These Japanese lawsuit guitars are of legendary quality and are highly sought after because: So it sounds like a good idea to search for these lawsuit guitars on Ebay in order to get a great sounding vintage guitar at a good price. Some sellers claim falsely to be selling a Japanese lawsuit guitar, while they are not. In the late 1970s, there was a general dip in the quality of the production ethic of most mainstream American guitar companies.Most of the best Japanese replicas, excluding Tokai, were built between 19 in the Fugi-gen Gakki factory by Japanese luthiers, these include the "lawsuit" guitars and forced Fender and Gibson to license this factory to produce their branded products in Japan.