If the requirements above sound good, we think that you are a great applicant for student loan refinancing and consolidation.

Each lender has its own specific underwriting criteria, so you may have a higher chance of approval at certain lenders.

It can even hurt your ability to rent an apartment or sign up for a new cell phone plan.

And depending on the type of loans you have, creditors can take some of your wages, withhold your tax refund or take you to court to collect the debt you owe.

This is often the reason that people cite when they say you shouldn’t combine federal and private loans.

But before you dismiss the idea of refinancing, you should first take a look to see if any of these benefits apply to you.

With an average balance of $28,400, student debt is a big part of the average college graduate's life.

At Lend EDU, we help borrowers compare the top student loan companies in one place.

We put together this guide to help you get information on all of the top student loan refinance lenders without having to jump around multiple websites.

After you are done, you will know how to refinance and consolidate student loans. You may now have a general idea of how to refinance student loans and how to consolidate student loans, as well as the basics of what each lender offers, but there is much more information you should know before choosing a lender.

The decision whether or not to consolidate can be tricky.

There are many different factors for students to consider in order to ensure that they’re making the right choices for their families and their wallets.

Student loan consolidation is a relatively easy concept to understand: it is the process of taking multiple student loans and combining them into one. Before consolidation, a student borrower might have multiple loans to pay back and many different loan balances to track.